Recommendations For Tackling Gender Disparity For Governments

Recommendations For Tackling Gender Disparity For Governments

May 4, 2021
Procurement

Clearly, the UK Government is a leader in the field of open data and transparency: it is this commitment to transparency as well as a commitment to addressing the issue of gender and work that has made this research possible. Whilst some of this report may make it difficult reading for some parts of the public sector supply chain, our research makes it easier for our government to address the gender pay gap in public contracting and to use procurement expenditure to deliver improved social outcomes for its citizens.

1. Publish more open data.

Other governments around the world should follow suit and openly publish their contracting and gender pay gap reporting data. Globally, public contracting is valued at $13trn or around 11% of global GDP, publishing this data using the Open Contracting Data Standard could significantly improve the position of women in the workplace around the world. The UK also has a role to play in making sure that this unique analysis is taken up by Government and used to deliver beneficial changes for women in the workplace.

2. Make gender pay disparity data part of supplier registration.

Governments are outsourcing more and more business to companies, they need to act if they don’t want to simply outsource their responsibility to women in the workplace. Even if data on gender disparity is not widely available, public sector buyers around the world can work with suppliers and industry bodies to establish the need to report on gender disparity as a condition of bidding for, or winning large public contracts.

3. Include gender profiling in beneficial ownership data.

It is not enough to understand whether there is a gender pay gap, much of the challenge associated with the world of work starts with company ownership and the overwhelming number of men who start and run companies. Profiling companies to establish whether they are owned in whole or in part by women can provide useful insights into whether female-owned companies are being given a chance to win business with government. A similar recommendation was made in a recent UK Government Digital Service commissioned report by Oxford Insights “Gender Equality and Social Inclusion in ICT Procurement”. Establishing this measure could also allow for specific programmes of support for female entrepreneurs who wish to sell into government.

4. Share good practice with the private sector.

Although UK government departments’ pay gap average is still 9.85% in men’s favour, their performance is better than their private sector partners and particularly the strategic suppliers. In this context, the public sector can provide good advice to their suppliers on how to reduce the pay gap.

5. Start to evaluate supplier’s performance on gender pay disparity during bids.

Public sector buyers are gatekeepers to a market worth nearly $13 trillion around the world. These buyers are therefore in a unique position to affect the corporate strategies of the companies bidding for this business. If governments are serious about tackling the gender pay disparity, then they should be willing to ask suppliers with the worst pay disparity what they are doing to address their performance. At the same time, buyers should be willing to award contracts to suppliers that have a better pay disparity performance than their rivals.

For instance, the UK’s policy to consider social value in the awarding of central government contracts could be updated to explicitly evaluate the gender pay gap of bidders on contracts and whether that pay gap is either increasing or decreasing.

The OECD has shown that 50% of governments have legislative frameworks that tackle the issue of gender in public procurement. Fully implementing these legal options will depend on better use of open data for contracting.

6. Work towards continuous improvement in gender pay as part of contract management.

The bid process only represents a single snapshot in time and requires contract management to monitor and enforce action plans. One way to encourage better performance is to measure the progress that suppliers make in gender pay disparity over the duration of a contract. As a condition for entering on frameworks or to become eligible to enter a contract, public buyers can request regular submission of evidence of work on action plans for gender equality in pay and audit these. Buyers should monitor how the average pay disparity across a category changes over time and adopt greater or lesser interventions according to annual progress.

Get in touch, if you’d like to discuss how we can help with your government procurement data needs.

June 9, 2021

Commit To Net Zero To Win Government Contracts.

....So says the Cabinet Office, with new measures released on World Environment Day that will require businesses to publish clear and credible...
June 2, 2021

Major Procurement Project For Inverness Castle

This week sees Highland Council publish the main construction and refurbishment tenders for the Inverness Castle Transformation project, through Public Contracts Scotland...
May 27, 2021

Six Considerations When Marketing To Governments.

We might say marketing to the government is similar to marketing to any other target market, particularly another B2B target market. And...
May 17, 2021

Data Mastery.

It's easy to say that you're a 'world leading' enterprise. It's much harder to back it up. But we genuinely believe that...
June 2, 2021

Does Government Business Correlate To Gender Disparity?

As part of our Procuring Inequality report, we've analysed whether winning government business equates to a gender pay disparity. By linking gender...
May 5, 2021

The Worst Performing Suppliers To Government In The Gender Pay Divide.

As our analysis of the gender pay gap within strategic suppliers to government from our Procuring Inequality report, showed a broad overlap...
May 18, 2021

Does The Number Of Women In Top Jobs Affect The Gender Pay Divide?

Through the creation of our report Procuring Inequality, we have analysed the proportion of women in the top jobs among the highest...
May 18, 2021

How The Gender Pay Gap Differs By Procurement Category.

As part of our exploration into the gender pay gap through our report, Procuring Inequality, we analysed the industry sectors and how...
April 29, 2021

Exploring The Gender Pay Gap in Strategic Suppliers To Government

From our report, Procuring Inequality, the disparity in the gender pay gap is stark when looking at the strategic suppliers to the...
April 29, 2021

Do Government Buyers Perform Better In Gender Parity?

Part of our report Procuring Inequality, includes a gender pay gap comparison between Government departments and significant suppliers to government. Our analysis...
April 28, 2021

Procuring Inequality: Our Report.

Spend Network is pleased to release our survey on the gender pay gap data in public procurement. We linked gender pay gap...
April 26, 2021

Our New Global Classification Tool

We recently launched our new global classification tool. Just three months later and we've been able to launch an upgraded version, which...
April 26, 2021

UK Government Procurement Under Pressure

Yesterday the FT published an article, £19bn of UK Covid-related contracts awarded without seeking rival bids. The report reviewed the value of...
April 26, 2021

Selling to procurement: No One Cares About Your Product

Selling to procurement professionals is something that most people find frustrating, mainly because they are highly resistant to direct sales. Why? Well,...
April 26, 2021

8 Reasons Why Procurement Doesn’t Need Blockchain.

Blockchain is fundamentally a database, but rather than a database where one item is allowed to replace another, each change to the...

Newsletter

Compelling research, insights and data directly into your inbox.

Recent media stories

Search